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Obscure Wine, Surprising Wine – Updated!

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I do hate to admit it, but I am lusting for an obscure wine. To satisfy my craving, I joined the Paris Wine Club.  I found this club when refining my search looking for that La Galoche Beaujolais Blanc back in May.  That search turned me on to so many great wine opportunities connecting me with McCarus Beverage Co. here in Charleston and Paris Wine Company in Northern California.  In addition to being an importer and distributor, Paris Wine Company has a club that features small winemakers throughout France that produce lower volume, classic French wines that do not usually see the light of day in the US. Obscure wine? Not if you live in France but here absolutely.  Then again, that is not true anymore.

If you are not yet in the sweltering days of summer, you may want to join this club if you like obscure, delicious French wine.  $79.99 for three bottles and that includes shipping, plus 10% off any other tag along purchases.  If you are, then wait until fall, and we can taste these wines together.

Quick, Quick, It’s getting hot!

My timing sucked as we head into the five months of 90 plus degrees here in the South, so I had to get my first shipment before the weather made it impossible to ship.  While we will start back up in September, I was able to get the May selections (which I will be reviewing soon) delivered.  I also ordered two more bottles as a tag along.  A tag along is additional choices from the company selections that are not part of the three bottle selection. Since it was shipping with my wine club order I got 10% off, and the shipping for the additional wine is free, so it was an opportunity not to be missed.  There are many wines in their catalog that intrigued me, but two stood out. The Domaine B. Millet Sancerre Rouge 2014 and the Valentin Morél, Les Pieds Sur Terre, Jura, Trousseau “Les Trouillots” 2015.

The Regions: Sancerre and Jura

When you hear the name Sancerre, I am sure you think white wine.  Your mouth waters for a delicious Sauvignon Blanc, some of the finest in France. But before the mid-nineteenth century phylloxera epidemic that decimated the French wine industry, Sancerre was primarily a red wine producer.  Today 25% of the grapes grown in Sancerre are Pinot Noir.  I should have known after drinking that sensational Paul Thomas Sancerre Rosé that I blogged about last April.  That wine quickly rose to the top of our list for special occasion rosés, and we have four bottles in the wine cooler waiting for that opportunity.  It may end up just being a Tuesday, but it will become special when we drink that wine! So now this Sancerre red wine shows up on my radar.  I had to try it.

obscure wine

Then there is Jura, one of France’s smallest wine regions. It lies in eastern France between Burgundy and Switzerland.  I had never heard of Jura before, but when I told Gary I ordered a bottle he about pee’ed himself.  He tasted a bottle of wine from this region a while back when working at The Wine Shop and he loved it. This region has long cold winters and hot summers with lots of rain. The vines are trained to grow high off the ground to avoid spring frosts.  This is a region that needs much patience as you may be harvesting in November. Pinot Noir, Trousseau, and Poulsard are the three red varietals with Chardonnay and Savagnin as the two whites. Trousseau and Savagnin are ancient varietals, so there is much history in these grapes that have been with us for centuries.

obscure wineSurprising Wine: Domaine B. Millet, Sancerre Rouge 2014

This is a light-bodied, medium alcohol (12.5%) Pinot Noir wine.  It is a clear garnet color with gold edges.  When I dove in for the nose, I got baked tart cherry pie.  I wanted to “eat” it.  I would say that for those that drink American Pinot Noir this is closest to the Oregon-style.  Light on the palate with not too much fruit, but a tartness reminiscent of the cherries in the nose.  There is a hint of black pepper and it is a tad dry on the finish.

It is not a flavor profile that I am immediately drawn to, but I have to say, I like this wine.  Not because I need to or want to.  It is just perfect red wine for summer consumption.

This wine can be purchased from the Paris Wine Company directly for $27.99 plus shipping.  If you become a club member, you save 10%.

Obscure Wine: Valentin Morel, Les Pieds Sur Terre, Jura, Trousseau “Les Trouillots” 2015

The literal translation of the name of this wine is “Feet on the Ground”.  The producer is Valentin Morel; the region is Jura. The grape varietal is Trousseau, and the vineyard where it is grown is Les Trouillots. Whew!  That is a mouthful, and so is this wine!

I have three words for the wine: Dee Lish Us!.  We loved it.  It is light-bodied, light tannins with medium-high alcohol content at 14%.  Strangely enough (at least for me) when I went in for the aroma I got milk chocolate and spice.  That is such an odd smell for me to put on wine but I struggled with the nose. I knew what I sensed, but could not put a name to it until I pulled out my tasting guide and then as I read the possibilities, it made total sense.  There is a silkiness to the texture.  This wine hugs my tongue, and I like it!

Gary said he got light Christmas spices on the palate but also agreed with my assessment.  He asked me to find more.  We drank this wine with a slight chill which was perfect for this warm summer evening.  This wine would go incredibly well with charcuterie and stinky cheese.  Oh God, I love stinky cheese!

You can get this wine directly from the Paris Wine Company for $34.99 plus shipping.  I am told that goat.sheep.cow.north has what is left in the state of South Carolina, but at what price I am not sure.

UPDATE:  goat.sheep.cow. has sold out. But it is still available through Paris Wine Company.

 

Cheers,

 

rick

obscure wine

 

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